Fancy Corners.

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Fancy Corners.

Postby prospero » Thu Nov 09, 2017 1:02 am

This is really for Mark NYAF. :D

My experiment with Lion 'Pasta' corners. :D

It doesn't look too bad, in fact I sold the picture. Lot of faffing about though.

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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby featurepiece » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:18 am

Just fantastic!!! :) :clap: :clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby kartoffelngeist » Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:12 pm

Love the washlines. Good job.
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby poliopete » Thu Nov 09, 2017 4:39 pm

Peter, absolutely superb :clap:

Please talk us through your method.

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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Not your average framer » Thu Nov 09, 2017 11:28 pm

Specially for me! I'm honoured. Thank you very much. 8)

Properro has already heard me discussing this idea, but the rest of you guys have not. I'm looking at buying a scroll saw and cutting out my own carved ornaments. It's not a job for the faint hearted and not everybody will find this something that they can do. I also would not expect to get the money back doing this, but it something I know I'd get a kick out of.

The technique is a difficult one. You have to mark out the details on the reverse face of the board that you are using and cut through the board in the same position with the blade set at the same angle both ways. This will result in a V-groove in the piece of board when you turn it the right way round. The top of the area between the pre-cut grooves is now shaped as required using wood carving chisels and gouges to round of the top of the details.

I already have my own wood carving tools and use them on a regular basis, so I won't find this to much bother. I would imagine that not many forum members will want to even bother trying this - Too much of a learning curve, but who knows it might be an interesting subject for discussion after all. A good wood for this could be obeche 6mm thick spacers, I've got some which are 1.75 inches wide!

BTW, I've got plenty of those particular corner ornaments. For me they need cutting down at the back, as they stick out a bit too far from the surface that you fix them to.
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby prospero » Fri Nov 10, 2017 1:13 am

:D

The base moulding on my frame was some rather naff foiled/sprayed gold, but it was a nice shape and had the running patterns
already on. I rubbed it down and primed it with shellac.

To make a flat section on the ends of the rails in knocked up a makeshift jig so I could saw the ornamented ridge off.

The pasta ornaments come in pairs - left and right. Easy enough to glue/nail in place but they vary a lot and don't fit absolutely
neatly in place. Bit of fettling called for. Then when they are firmly fixed in place they need a heck of a lot of filling and blending.

All-in-all a worthwhile exercise but not really practical if you had to do a lot of them. I do have the satiafaction of knowing that the
frame is the only one like it in the known Universe. 8)
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Jamesnkr » Fri Nov 10, 2017 9:45 am

Not your average framer wrote:I also would not expect to get the money back doing this, but it something I know I'd get a kick out of.


Mark, there are many framers doing this and making good money out of it. Charge more.
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Not your average framer » Fri Nov 10, 2017 8:39 pm

At my age I'm not looking to expand, but to slowly wind down a bit. However, I do enjoy doing a bit of something with creative challenges and to be honest I think that a scroll saw and the things I could make with it would be very tempting to me.

Realistically a scroll saw is at least partly an indulgence, but Christmas is coming. Guess what I fancy for Christmas?
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Not your average framer » Sat Nov 11, 2017 8:17 pm

I'm have just been and collected my scroll saw. It works quite well, but a bit of fine tuning and practice is now required. I bought ten of each coarse, mediun and fine tooth blades and my first attempts at using the saw have already convinced me that I won't have much use for the coarse and medium blades.

I already was aware that the more expensive blades don't tend to pull to one side, while cheaper blades pull towards the side which has the burrs resulting from the blades being stamped out. This does not happen with the more expensive blades because the sides are ground to remove the burrs. I had no idea how much the cheaper blades pull to one side, from my first trial I would say that the pulling to one side is more than I expected and will need fine tuning to sort this out.

I'm also going to be checking out the internet for some better quuality extra fine teeth blades to see what difference these are likely to make. I suspect that the difference will be significant. There are also ways of fine tuning and tweeking to get the machine nicely zeroed in to get the blade to cut much nearer to the centre line of the machine, unfortunately scrool saw always cut a bit to one side and it takes practice to produce really accurate cuts.

It's also got a nice flexible drive cable was just about every attachment that you could possibly want, which will save me ever needing to buy a Dremel and tools. Currently I need to practice before I will be ready to attempt any degree of precise work, but I will get there.
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Not your average framer » Sun Nov 12, 2017 9:23 pm

It turns out that the better blades that is described as more expensive are not particularly more expensive, instead they are just more difficult to get!
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby prospero » Mon Nov 13, 2017 9:27 am

Ever considered baking your own frames Mark? :roll:

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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby poliopete » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:27 pm

:clap: :clap: :clap:
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby kartoffelngeist » Mon Nov 13, 2017 2:47 pm

That's just made me hungry now!
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby prospero » Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:37 pm

You can have the recipe if you like. :P
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby poliopete » Mon Nov 13, 2017 5:37 pm

Personally I think the idea is half baked :shock: but if it earns you a crust go for it :lol:
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Not your average framer » Mon Nov 13, 2017 7:50 pm

I'm not sure how well the paint would stick. :lol:
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Re: Fancy Corners.

Postby Not your average framer » Mon Nov 13, 2017 8:33 pm

I've just bought some better blades for my scroll saw. They are in a completely different league to the machine manufacturers blades and amazing as it may sound, they actually cost less that the more basic blades. They are much more controllable, cut amazingly cleanly (with no break out on either side) and cut face of the wood is totally smooth with no cutting marks what so ever.

When using the saw in ways that scroll saws are usually used for the results are beyond my wildest expectations, but although it will do much more, I really don't think it going to be as controllable with some of the things that I was contemplating doing such as cutting through the thickness of wood pasta ornament when these are edge on to the machines table.

Unfortunately I have a damaged antique mirror and wash stand in for repair and I need to cut through the thickness of some wood ornaments, to reduce the thickness and to correct a difference between the thickness from one side of the ornament to the other. This will be more difficult than I was hoping, it will involve cutting a bit of scrap wood to exactly the angle required, gluing the ornament to the wood and then making a vertical cut.

This sort of saw needs a pencil line to follow with the saw blade to do this and I not sure how this will turn out.

Having said all that, I already have no doubt that it is well up to the job of making ornaments using obeche, but after cutting intricate shapes out of obeche, I find that thin sections in obeche are not able to resist to much force and although reasonable strong along the grain, against the grain it is too easy to break it along the grain, so I'm already thinking what would be a better choice of wood.

Plywood would provide considerable strength, but I don't think rounding off the tops of detail cut into plywood has much chance of working using wood curving tools. I know this will work well in MDF, but I don't like the idea of MDF dust while cutting it on the saw. I need tp think about this more! Maybe I will glue some strong, but thin fabric on to both sides of the wood before cutting it. I already know that the saw was well worth getting!
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