Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

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Not your average framer
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Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 14 Jul, 2021 8:09 pm

Here's another photo. The mouldings are Simons 0PINE/0028 and Rose and Hollis A10 (pine).
Double stacked frame.JPG
I've only recently bought the Rose and Hollis moulding and today was my first time to use this moulding, I had only just put some glue between the two mouldings and the phone rang. By the time that I got back to the two mouldings thad glue had set, so I did not get the chance to pin them together as tightly as I planed. The finish is oxide red base coat, with a grey wash and this moulding combination is a quite usefully affordable combination.

I want to try a few more colour and wash combinations, as well.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 14 Jul, 2021 9:55 pm

Not every moulding and hand finishing combination which I try always gets to see the light of day in my shop, but this is one which I think is set to go further. I really like the combination of the red and the grey and I can see other colours working equally well with the grey. I am also thinking about trying the same mouldings in white, with a colour accent on the sight edge of the top moulging, which I also think will work quite nicely. The combined cost of the two bare wood mouldings is particularly good value for money to me.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by fitz » Wed 14 Jul, 2021 10:05 pm

I like the rustic look of this moulding and would be interested to see other colour combinations. I can see that the larger (outer moulding) is flat but is the inner one also flat or slightly cushioned? A wee bit hard to tell from the photo.

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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 14 Jul, 2021 11:13 pm

The smaller inner moulding is 12mm wide x 12mm deep and in the pine version your will be amazed how cheap it is. The wider outer moulding is usefully cheap too! A much easier finish would be to just do it all in one colour. For me the cost of the materials and producing frames from this combination is a real big deal. There can be a really good price differential between the cost of producing this and the potential selling price. It also has quite attractive and fairly generous proportions, so even with a really helpful mark up it does not seem expensive.

I'm always interested in how the labour cost compares with the material cost. This is a big key to profitability! I am also very intereted in what proportion of the selling price stays with me compared to what proportion is paid to the moulding supplier. I guess that most forum members already have some idea about the fact that I am not in particularly good health and that I have a pretty big preocupation with getting the most out of the time it takes to do things. I am not well enough to compete with normal healthier people on equal terms. I like to have an edge somewhere and doing a lot with less material cost is where I'm at.

Everyone is telling us that there is a rather nasty recesson ahead and maybe having a smart plan to make nice things for not very much might be quite a smart move at some time in the future. I could keep what I am doing to myself, but I am not doing so! Not everyone is taking notice of what I am doing, but some probably are and they will be in a positions to reap the benefits. It's not just about making more for less, but I even make some saleable items from my waste.

When things get tough and finding money to buy materials is not easy, being able to make product from your waste is a real big deal, don't you think. Feel free to ask any questions, which you think will help you and I'll do my best to help.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by fitz » Thu 15 Jul, 2021 10:08 pm

Thanks Mark. Just had a wee look at your shop there. Looks great and a nice town, pity there was a great big lorry parked in front of your place when Google were filming 🙄. I have an increasing customer base looking for shabby chic and flea market style mouldings which are all very expensive from the likes of Lion etc and many baulk at the price quoted. I would like to venture into creating mouldings like that and produce from bare wood mouldings the distressed look that a lot of folks are after. I got my copy of the book you recommended but I agree it is a heavy read and perhaps a bit dated although there are nuggets in there too. I’m going to experiment with various finishes and see what develops. It all seems quite satisfying in any case along the lines of nothing ventured…….thanks again👍

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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 6:13 am

It is helpful to look up images on the internet for furniture of the same colours for the various stain colours in the stain recipes in that book, Many of the stain recipes are using not particularly helpful ingredients, which are not easy to obtain, if at all. I often substitute an equivalent colour ingredient as a acrylic artist paint instead and mix the colours to match furniture colours for internet images. It is necessary to adjust the colours to compensate for the background colours of the wood type being stained. There's no advantage in taking much notice of quantities and ratios in the books recipes at all, just mx the colours by eye. I particularly like the Polyvine acrylic wax finish varnish stain colours, which are not always perfect on every background colour for each and every wood type and this is where you can modify the stain colour with acrylic artist paints to tweek the colours to suit. Much of the time it is better to wait a short while a wipe away any stain colour, which remains of the surface of items being stained, to avoid an unnecessary level of gloss.

Not all woods stain as well as others and sometimes it is necessary to pre treat the wood to prevent patchy stain absorption. This is easily accomplished with a little watered down emulsion paint of a similar colour to the background colour of the unstained wood, which soaks in to areas of the wood, which are normally much too absorbent. The colour of the excess absorbed colour does not show as it is not different from the base colour ofthe wood, but it does block the over absorbent pores of the wood. There is a phenominum known as grain revesal, where some parts of the wood grain absorb excess stain creating an unnatural looking effect, where the stain wood just does not look like real wood when stained pine. I like to use pine mouldings, but it is necessary to learn how to prevent pine from absorbing stain in such a way as too develop an unnatural look, I also like to soften the visual effects of the grain to create the impression that it is a generally better quality of wood type, which results in a more easily saleable item. This is often achieveable by washing the wood first with some well watered down off white emulsion paint before staining the wood.

I don't necessarily wait for the watered down emulsion paint to fully dry, so that alittle of the watered down paint leaks out into the water based stain and creates a slightly misty effect within the applied stain and creates an apparently softer looking woodgrain. Did you notice that the two stacked and hand finished mouldings in the photo are knot free. Not all small pine mouldings are knot free, but some are! it depend manly on where the manufacturer get their wood from. I hope that this is helpful to you!
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by prospero » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 9:48 am

Using three square mouldings is very effective. It's all in the proportionate widths. :D

This just has a coat of pale shellac and a dragged wash of white ripple paint.

3sq002.jpg
mo002.jpg
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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 10:16 am

Hi Peter,

I do something similar, but I suspect that yours is a bit wider than mine. My middle moulding looks a bit narrower than yours! I like the two moulding version, because the material cost is really low, but it looks like it oucht to cost more!
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

Not your average framer
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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 12:42 pm

I have been considering making a deep stepped inwards stacked moulding frame that progressively steps back inside like some of the popular Art Deco frames. The only problem is that the material cost and labour cost won't be cheap! It will need to be four different mouldings stacked together, so not exactly simple, quick and easy. By the time I have priced it to cover my costs and allowed a worthwhile profit margin, it may not be particularly easy to sell, but it could look amazing!
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by GeoSpectrum » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 3:25 pm

Here is something I made earlier..this one steps
Outwards and down or upwards and in….
B78B2F54-7DFA-4159-8CD5-9501C36EBA2A.jpeg
Alan Huntley
Ashcraft Framing
Plain wood frames, Inlay/tray frames and painted frames for artists.
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Not your average framer
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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by Not your average framer » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 3:36 pm

Hi Alan,

Yes, I like that! I have a massive chevron sample of something along the same lines, except mine is black over a textured oxide red base coat which has been lightly distressed to let a little of the red show through. Frames like this can create a very dramatic result, where the artwork will work well with this sort of frame. I don't need much pursuaing when it comes to dramatic art deco frames! I'm a real big fan of stuff like this.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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Re: Two pine mouldings stacked and hand finished.

Post by fusionframer » Fri 16 Jul, 2021 7:54 pm

Love that frame Alan. Very effective.
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