Pet hates

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prospero
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Re: Pet hates

Post by prospero » Thu 17 Oct, 2019 3:33 pm

Pullover sleeves. :evil:

Now the weather is turning a bit chilly I have donned my woolly pully. :D

Trouble is, if you roll the sleeves up they don't stay up. :roll:

Painting frames, I trail them all over the wet paint. :?

Then I found an elastic band. :)

Put the band on just above my elbow. Can't feel it or even know It's there. :lol:

Works a treat. Sleeves stay out of the paint. :clap:


All I need now is a rubber band for the other arm. :P

Can I find one? Can I f-fairy cakes. :|
Watch Out. There's A Humphrey About

Jo
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Re: Pet hates

Post by Jo » Thu 17 Oct, 2019 4:23 pm

Ha ha, know what you mean about long sleeves, luckily some ladies jumpers are available with 3/4 sleeves which are brilliant!

My husband bought a pair of sleeve garters for a Peaky Blinders party that will probably never be used again - shall I post them on?!! Or just this pile of elastic bands that are sitting at the end of bench... :lol:

poliopete
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Re: Pet hates

Post by poliopete » Fri 18 Oct, 2019 7:26 am

Woolly pully sleeves.

I like mine down but, I am a frequent hand washer and as a consequence my sleeves get wet :x and so uncomfortable. When painting/staining etc I have a box of those cheap disposable surgical gloves.

If it's not to cold my solution is to wear a sleeveless wooly jumper under my piny :giggle:

I will try the elastic band trick though. Thanks :D

Peter.

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prospero
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Re: Pet hates

Post by prospero » Fri 18 Oct, 2019 11:01 am

I used to wear a pinny but it chafed the back of my neck. :evil: :lol:

I have two wardrobes. One is permanently covered in paint and the other......isn't. :D
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Not your average framer
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Re: Pet hates

Post by Not your average framer » Fri 18 Oct, 2019 11:57 am

I work wearing an armless fleece which zips up at the front. It's not the height of elegance as it has various traces of PVA glue and paint, which in spite of trying to sponge off before things get the chance to set, you never really quite manage to leave no trace at all. I don't seen to get paint, or glue onto my shirt sleeves for some unknown reason, so this does not seem to be a problem.

My shop is an old shop and was built during the reign of Queen Elizabeth the first. It's not especially warm in cold weather and does not have central heating, so I rely upon a plug in oil filled radiator and a small fan heater. These two heaters are placed close together and their thermostats are set, to allow the fan heater to provide some fast heat, but the oil filled radiator, by being close to the fan heater soon generates enough heat to trip the thermostat in the fan heater and quickly shut down the fan heater.

The shop does not get massively warm and the thermostat knobs are taped in position, so as to not get disturbed. I am a type 2 diabetic and my body temperature tend to go up and down a bit, which means I have a jumper I can remove, or replace during working. As a result my winter electricity bills remain reasonably low and affordable, but the shop is still at a relatively comfortable temperature. I have a a number of working jumpers that I've bought from local charity shops.

The jumpers are not all that smart and some are beginning to look a bit fuzzy, but it's a working environment and I'm there to be the worker, so I figure that's all right.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

cleaver
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Re: Pet hates

Post by cleaver » Fri 18 Oct, 2019 5:44 pm

Get some arm gators, Prospero.... stick on some rag time jazz, and pretend you're in The Sting.

:D
:head:

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prospero
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Re: Pet hates

Post by prospero » Fri 18 Oct, 2019 11:01 pm

I'm trying to invent some new varnish, and to this end I had to buy some real Turpentine. The stuff I got has a really nice smell.
I think I'm going to use this instead of the White Spirit I use routinely. I don't really notice the odours that permeate my workshop
as you get used to it, but visitors often remark (mostly favourably) on how it smells. Although I did nearly asphyxiate the post lady
one morning. :cry:
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poliopete
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Re: Pet hates

Post by poliopete » Sat 19 Oct, 2019 6:31 am

I love the way my workshop smells. It's a combination of germylene, wintergreen and old spice :D but it must be too warm as the customers always leave the door open :?

Not your average framer
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Re: Pet hates

Post by Not your average framer » Sat 19 Oct, 2019 10:34 am

Customers are always telling me how much they like the smell of my shop as well. I think it's mostly the smell of wood and the small of paste wax. I don't notice it very much, but I have several bare wood pine mouldings which I either regularly use for quick and easy handfinished mouldings, or stacked together to create reasonably priced larger profiles. Therefore I am guessing that the pine probably accounts for a good proportion of the woody part ot the smell.

There are a few larger pine mouldings that I slice up by rip cutting them on my bandsaw and this produces very fine sawdust, which probably realses the smell of the pine quite effectively because of the smaller sawdust particules. I can recommend a medium sized band saw as a good way of slicing up nicel shaped and reeded pine mouldings for stacking the bits together with less exciting looking cheaper pine mouldings.

Stacked moulding frames can be a very helpful way of creating very nice looking larger profiles at a cost that enables you to make a little bit more on jobs that would otherwise be a lot tighter on resulting profit margins. Many left over bits get re-used as wood which can be cut to size as spacers, or whatever. Very little of this wood gets wasted and the bandsaw has more than paid for it's self quite quickly.

I make up and sell some ready made frames, often using left over lengths of moulding and where appropriate add spacers made from my left over pine off cuts, which generally creates useful extra interest from the customers. Rather ordinary looking ready made frames usually just don't sell, because they look too much like cheap mass market chain store fodder.

Foot fall is a lot less than 10 years ago, so I have to be more creative to generate the impulse sales, which in tern creates more of that woody smell that customers like. I've got several large bits of secondhand mirror glass and make up small mirrors with shelves, which tend to sell to customers looking for affordable presents. Again the important factors are price, not too bulky to carry away and as usual they do need to look somewhat special.

I slice bits off from larger well shaped mouldings to make the shelf brackets to support the selves and this save a lot of time and effort in making these mirror frames. If you can make these a something that is quick and easy, there's no point. The money is in the quick and easy bit, there are also some very cost effective pine mouldings about if you don't mind keeping an eye open for the worthwhile prices. And it all adds to that nice woody smell when customers come in.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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