Moulding search

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photech54
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Moulding search

Post by photech54 » Wed 07 Apr, 2021 8:42 am

Hi all,

Anybody know where I can find this moulding, or something very similar?

It measures 15mm deep x 25mm across the face.

I've searched through the Centrado, Lion and Larson Juhl catalogues, but no luck so far...

Any suggestions gratefully received.

Cheers,

Gary
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Not your average framer
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Re: Moulding search

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 07 Apr, 2021 10:59 am

That looks like the Simons drift range, but it does not normal come in that two tone lined finish. It's a very basic and cheap moulding and is very quick and easy to add the limed finish. These no shortage of frames who buy this moulding and add the limed finish, it's a great way of adding extra value to a otherwise nice a inexpensive moulding. . My technique for liming this moulding is to add a moderately thin coat of Polyvine dead flat (Matt) acrylic wax finish varnish and afer it's dried apply a 50/50 mix the craig and rose chalky emulsion of the required colour and a reasonably thickish acrylic paint of much the same colour. My method is to chemically distress the added paint with a mixture of acetone and methelated sirits.

The acetone is an exceedingly powerful sovent and needs to be reduced in it's agressiveness, otherwise it will remove everything in one go (not what you want). The intermidiate layer of Polyvine dead flat acryilic wax finish varnish is so you can see the under laying original paint finish before you remove too much and take in down to the bare wood. The dead flat varnish contain a significant amount of colloidial silica, which is how the make the acrylic dead matt. Colloidial silica makes this varnish very tough in deed and help you to avoid removing too much too quickly with the mix of solverts. I usually add about a couple of teasppons of acetone to a 250ml of maybe even a 500ml full bottle of methelated spirit.

Over time some of the acetone will evapourate and reduce the strength of the solvent mix and it will lose some of it's effectiveness, but all is not lost just add a tiny little bit of exrta acetone to bring it up to strength again and you are go to go. I'm probably talkingabout add 1/2 a tespoon of acetone and in the worst case perhaps one teaspoon. Don't over do the acetone as the results can be disasterous, acetone is a seriously strong solvent - Be warned, I am not joking! During the lock down, I also used a small bottle of Cellulose thinners from my local hard ware shop in place of the acetone.

You should be aware that Commercial cellulose contains Di chloro metane which is not good to breathe the vapour from, or get on to your skin as it can pass through your skin in to your bloodstream. I would strongly urge you to check out the material safety sheet on the internet for this solvent. It is an inorganic solvent and your body cannot metabolise it to remove any of it which may get in to your body. In extreme cases it can cause chrystals to form in the brain and event cause blindness in really bad cases. Use it in a well ventilated space, I make sure that I open the shop door and I'm in the habit of evaporating this solvent with a hot air gun and blowing it out of the shop with a lot of air flow from a fan. I think that using a lot of air flow is a good quite important.
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

photech54
Posts: 35
Joined: Fri 28 Jan, 2011 11:59 am
Location: Cambridge
Organisation: PhotoArt GB Ltd
Interests: Photography, Contemporary Art, Cycling, Entomology,

Re: Moulding search

Post by photech54 » Wed 07 Apr, 2021 1:42 pm

Hi,

Wow, that's a comprehensive answer. Thanks very much for taking the time to type all of that, very helpful.

I'll get in touch with Simons and see if it's a moulding that they can help me with.

Cheers,

Gary

Justintime
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Re: Moulding search

Post by Justintime » Wed 07 Apr, 2021 1:47 pm

Or you could buy a pot of liming wax, rub on, leave 10 minutes and rub back with neutral wax. (Onto a stained wood by the looks of it.)

Not your average framer
Posts: 10373
Joined: Sat 25 Mar, 2006 8:40 pm
Location: Devon, U.K.
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Interests: Lost causes, saving and restoring old things, learning something every day
Location: Glorious Devon

Re: Moulding search

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 07 Apr, 2021 6:15 pm

Oh yes. liming was works also works very well and the results is a good quality result as well. As Arthur Daley would say, " the world's your lobster" so take your pick!
Mark Lacey

“Life is short. Art long. Opportunity is fleeting. Experience treacherous. Judgement difficult.”
― Geoffrey Chaucer

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