Wax protection

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Wax protection

Postby Jules007 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 1:43 pm

I made up a frame using plain unfinished Ayous which the customer took away in order to give it their own paint finish. They've just returned it and said that they actually prefer the plain wood finish it has now. I would like to give it some sort of wax finish to protect it but not to change the look ie not give it a shine or darken it. Does anyone have any advice on any particular type and brand of wax to use?

Many thanks
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Re: Wax protection

Postby prospero » Thu Dec 07, 2017 5:12 pm

I get this sometimes. If it were oak or ash it's quite possible to wax it but softer woods wouldn't take it so well
without some sort of sealer under the wax. Trouble is the sealer tends to alter the look of the 'raw wood' finish.
For that matter, so would the wax.

Best to try a scrap first and see how it turns out.
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Re: Wax protection

Postby Jules007 » Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:05 pm

Do you think a couple of coats of this would do the job?

https://www.lionpic.co.uk/p/8118/Libero ... ear--150ml
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Re: Wax protection

Postby fusionframer » Thu Dec 07, 2017 6:26 pm

I use liberon, but I get neutral rather than clear. I have used clear, but I went back to neutral as at the time preferred that to clear.

Problem is, I can't now remember why I preferred it, but I would choose neutral.

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Re: Wax protection

Postby GeoSpectrum » Thu Dec 07, 2017 7:47 pm

If I recall I think clear tends to yellow after a while which neutral doesn't. Don't ask me why though....
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Re: Wax protection

Postby vintage frames » Thu Dec 07, 2017 8:54 pm

If you want to see what wax will do on the surface, then give it a wipe with some white spirit. The spirit will evaporate cleanly away and leave no trace on the wood. And if you're happy with the effect, then the best wax to use is beeswax. But..
As Prospero said, you will need to seal the surface of the wood with dilute sanding sealer, otherwise the wax will dry patchy and uneven. And..
All commercial "beeswax" polishes are adulterated with less expensive paraffin waxes and these contribute to a more "greasy" finish.
So, if you want a nice dry wax finish you need to soak some beeswax pellets in some white spirit overnight and melt it gently to make a nice wax paste. When you rub this on, the white spirit will evaporate as before, leaving a thin film of pure beeswax which you can leave either dry and rough or polish gently with a cloth.
Don't use turpenine for this, as it can leave a slight resin like deposit after it has evaporated.
Having said all that, what do do want to protect the bare-wood from?
If they're not eating their dinner off the frame, then a rub with a wet cloth will easily remove any handling marks.
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Re: Wax protection

Postby fusionframer » Thu Dec 07, 2017 9:54 pm

GeoSpectrum wrote:If I recall I think clear tends to yellow after a while which neutral doesn't. Don't ask me why though....


Thank you, that was it. It does have a yellow look to it.

I have tried fiddes, colron and briwax and liberon is always the one I go back to.

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Re: Wax protection

Postby Jules007 » Fri Dec 08, 2017 3:53 pm

Thanks for your replies.

I think I'll give the Liberon a try although I can't see a 'neutral', only clear, pine and black.
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Re: Wax protection

Postby Tudor Rose » Fri Dec 08, 2017 4:00 pm

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Re: Wax protection

Postby Jules007 » Fri Dec 08, 2017 5:46 pm

Great. Thanks.
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