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Morso on solid floor

Posted: Fri 02 Feb, 2018 8:53 pm
by Ed209
At the moment my Morso is on carpet/underlay with suspended floorboards. I am still not 100% happy with the miters doesn’t appear to have slack in any of the components, Blades ground by Mainline, all clean and lined up correctly experimented with left fence adjustment but can’t help wondering if it was on solid base it might be more consistent.
Would mean me having to up some boards and casting a concrete plinth.


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Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Mon 05 Feb, 2018 9:28 pm
by poliopete
Hello Ed :D

Sorry you have had no response so far to your request for help :( and again sorry I have not much to offer. I can see you have considered a number of possibilities without success.

All I can say is a concrete plinth is worth a try. Although it would be a little disruptive for a day or so it's not a difficult task. I needed do this a few years ago when we installed a Stanley Waterford Range. My wife and I managed it without a problem. Obviously, get your mix right and make sure its level. :wink:

Failing that, I would bite the bullet and seek help from one of the two excellent and helpful equipment engineers we have who are both members of this forum. I realise this will be an expense but well worth it in the long run.

I do hope you sort this as I appreciate how frustrating it must be for you.

Peter.

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Tue 06 Feb, 2018 10:34 am
by Cherrytree
Hi Ed

We have a morso on carpet on an upstairs wooden floor and we don't have a problem with joints.

Bart

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Tue 06 Feb, 2018 10:52 am
by prospero
I don't think it's worth making a concrete base. I had mine on a very bumpy ancient upstairs floor for many
years with no problems.

What is the exact nature of the bad? A photo would be good. :D

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Tue 06 Feb, 2018 2:41 pm
by Not your average framer
My Morso is not on a particularly solid floor and can even rock about on odd occasions, but I don't have too much trouble with the quality of my mitres. It seems unlikely to me that creating a concrete base for your Morso is likely to make much difference. Sometimes I encounter problems with really hard wood and the wood on the lefthand side of the Morso tend to move away from the blades as the cut is being made. When this happens the solution is to clamp the wood on the left hand side to the Morso thereby preventing the movement.

BTW, is your left hand support arm level with the rest of the Morso when you are cutting moulding. A friend who while he was in my shop sat on the left hand extension and bent it downwards a few millimetres and this caused me some problems at the time, which were not easy to figure out how to correct them at first. Trying to put something right by changing something other than that which is causing the problem usually causes even more problems and can confuse things even more than before.

Morso's often need a bit of fine tuning and it can take a bit of detective work to figure out the cause of particular problems. Would you like to post some photos illustrating the problems that you are encountering to see what various members of the forum that about your problems and possible solutions. Currently we don't have much to go on, so suggestions are a bit vague. You've already tried a lot of the obvious things, so we need to look deeper to find out what's happening. There aren't many problems with Morso's that somebody else on the forum doesn't know about.

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Tue 06 Feb, 2018 2:56 pm
by poliopete
Hi Ed

At least I instigated some response :giggle:

If you can post some photo's as suggested there is a good chance that someone will help solve your problem :D

Peter.

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Tue 06 Feb, 2018 3:52 pm
by featurepiece
In my experience I'd question the blades. I'd buy a new set and try the cuts again. It'll save a lot of hassle if that what, ultimately, might be the issue.

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Tue 06 Feb, 2018 6:35 pm
by Not your average framer
I'd be surprised! The problem described is one of inconsistent mitres. Blade problems are more likely to produce consistently bad mitres. I'd rather wait to see some photos before trying to diagnose what's causing the problem.

Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Wed 07 Feb, 2018 10:32 pm
by Ed209
First thanks to Peter for getting the ball rolling I was beginning to feel like “Billy no mates” I have done some further tweaks and can now achieve good mitres I feel that I now probably need to upgrade to a numatic underpinner that pushes the mitres tight together presumably that is the intention or is it just to hold them in place? I have tried a Cassese CS299 on the Wessex training course and didn’t really take much notice of how it actually operated, with hindsight...
I do not have a Left hand table on Morso and no room to fit one, my left fence is now about 1mm out of parallel towards me from the Right and rule. I am sure I did read on here about Morso better on solid base which is why I made the inquiry but cant find in search, it may have been somewhere else even that I read it. Thanks again for reply’s will update if further problems occur with some photos. I sometimes wonder if I’m being to fussy and after a unachievable perfection


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Re: Morso on solid floor

Posted: Wed 07 Feb, 2018 11:43 pm
by poliopete
"First thanks to Peter for getting the ball rolling I was beginning to feel like "Billy no mates". Your welcome Ed, that really made me laugh :lol:

I'm so pleased you have managed to improve your mitres and IMHO a pneumatic under pinner is the way to go. I'm a great believer in moving your business forward by upgrading your kit or in any way you can. I remember my first pneumatic Cassese purchased many years ago when we had a busy shop/gallery. Our business became much more efficient and profitable overnight.

These days I have a second hand Cassese 89 that suits at the mo' but if I thought I would benefit with a better machine I would go for it at the drop of a hat.

You wrote, "I sometimes wonder if I'm being too fussy and after a unachievable perfection" If it's any consultation, a framed item rarely leaves me without me thinking that it could have been improved in some small way :roll:

Good luck Ed.

Peter.