Magazine Frame

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Magazine Frame

Postby PictureHouse » Sat Jan 26, 2019 6:11 pm

Hello all,

I was hoping you might be able to help. I've got a client who wants to frame some old 1970s Sunday Times magazines. A lot of the text isn't printed staight, so I explained that it would look would look weird in a window mount. She has asked about the possibility of surface mounting the whole magazine in a box frame. So my question is - how on earth would I mount the thing?

Thanks in advance!

Paul
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby featurepiece » Sat Jan 26, 2019 6:48 pm

Hi, take a look at this previous thread - you may find some of the details useful :)

https://www.theframersforum.com/viewtop ... jim+miller
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Not your average framer » Sat Jan 26, 2019 11:12 pm

Yes, Mylar is a very successful way of doing this sort of thing. Please be aware that there are various thicknesses of Mylar available and that the larger thicknesses will hold a crease very well.

Creases in thicker Mylar can be used in ways that snuggly fit around the edges of the book and will remain in place exactly positioned on the right angled corners of the book as a whole, giving improved support to the book.

I recently framed a program for a theater event about the book of mormon. it turned out very nicely and the customer was delighted. Cutting the Mylar cleanly and neatly may take a little practice, but it's only just getting used to working with Mylar, after that it gets really easy to do.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby PictureHouse » Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:06 am

Thanks for your replies. Am I right in thinking th mylar would pass under the cover of the book, and theough slits in the mountboard behind it?
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Not your average framer » Mon Jan 28, 2019 10:28 pm

That's one possibility, but don't think that you have to do it by the one prescribed method, the emphasis should be on obtaining the best combination of presentation and support for item being framed.

Sometimes, magazines, paperbacks and programs don't like to stay as flat as you want behind Mylar, but bulge a little in the middle. There are various ways to get the tension in the Mylar to work for you and not against you, but it often involves a little bit of trial and error before you get it right.

Mylar is still the most successful way of doing jobs like this and trial and error, pracitise and experience as always are the key to success.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Jim Miller » Fri Feb 01, 2019 10:00 pm

PictureHouse wrote:Thanks for your replies. Am I right in thinking th mylar would pass under the cover of the book, and theough slits in the mountboard behind it?
Yes, that is correct. Make the two horizontal slots in the mounting substrate the same width as the vertical sheet of clear film, and place them slightly within the height of the book, so that they are covered after the mount is completed. The horizontal wrap holds the book's covers tight against its pages. No adhesive touches the book.

Clear polyester film, such as Mylar-D, Melinex 516, and Hostaphan 43SM are extremely strong and dimensionally stable - this film will not stretch easily. I prefer to use 3-mil thickness, because it creases most sharply and conforms well to flat surfaces, making it most inconspicuous, but 5-mil and 7-mil are also appropriate for the purpose. The thicker films are easier to fold and crease without accidental damage in the handling, such as clam-shell creases and wrinkles.

All clear polyester film has curvature. Be sure to place the convex side against the book in order to have it lying flat against the surface. To secure the attachment, use a thin-ribbon polyester tape with good acrylic on both sides. Never use ATG or any other carrier-less adhesive on Mylar, as it would slip, migrate, and eventually fail.

Sometimes a newspaper or magazine with a flimsy paper cover can, as noted above, show some curvature. To keep it flat, place a piece of slightly-undersized matboard (excuse please...mountboard :D ) under the front cover.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Not your average framer » Fri Feb 01, 2019 10:46 pm

Hello Jim,

Is it possible to give us some idea what are the particular characteristics of Mylar D, Melinex 516, or Hostaphan 43SM that make these versions of what is essentially a particular variety of Polyester particularly most suited to this purpose. These particular brand names are to a large extent varieties that are better known in the USA than here in the UK. I have a large roll of Polyester film, which I bought from a packaging supplier as that was what I could get at the time and I have little idea how it compares with the types that you recommend.

Many thanks in anticipation,
Mark Lacey
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Jim Miller » Sat Feb 02, 2019 12:13 am

Hello Mark:

The clear films tested by the United States Library of Congress are the ones I have generally recommended to American framers. These are free of possibly-reactive chemical coatings, which are often applied to clear industrial films for the purpose of increasing paint/ink/glue adhesion for specific applications (such as battery coverings). Also, the recommended films have a "high slip" treatment, which inhibits the film's tendency to stick to itself.

The main thing is to get polyester film, and not polypropylene or some other kind of plastic. Polyester is incredibly strong, dimensionally stable, and relatively immune to deterioration from exposure to visible light and invisible UV radiation.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Not your average framer » Sun Feb 03, 2019 9:52 pm

Thanks very much Jim, that is very helpful.
Mark Lacey

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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Fellows Framing » Tue Feb 05, 2019 8:55 pm

Interesting thread.

Where do you get mylar or other polyester films from please? And how do you know which thickness you need?

Thanks
Sarah
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Jim Miller » Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:34 pm

Sarah:

In the USA you can buy it from most suppliers of conservation materials, plus a couple of framing suppliers, but I don;t know about sources in the UK.

3 mil is my favorite because it creases most sharply and it most inconspicuous in use, but 5 mil or 7 mil would be more forgiving of handling damage, such as clamshell creases during the folding of the mounts.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Tudor Rose » Tue Feb 05, 2019 9:57 pm

Fellows Framing wrote:Interesting thread.

Where do you get mylar or other polyester films from please? And how do you know which thickness you need?

Thanks
Sarah


We got our from Preservation Equipment Ltd https://www.preservationequipment.com/C ... ster-Rolls. We’ve got a heavier and lighter weight roll and there’s a good variety listed that match Jim’s suggestions.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby kuduframes » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:11 am

Lion 7595, Clear Polyester Film 95µ 760mm x 20m roll
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby poliopete » Wed Feb 06, 2019 9:32 am

The link provided by Tudor Rose for "PEL" is worth noting as they often have a stand at the Wessex Road Shows and can be persuaded to bring smaller quantities of their products along for collection. :D I have used this service on occasions and saved the delivery charge :giggle: They are an excellent company to deal with who have a comprehensive range of conservation products at a fair price.
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Re: Magazine Frame

Postby Fellows Framing » Wed Feb 06, 2019 1:49 pm

Thank you all, thats a big help.

Have the Wessex road shows been announced for this year??
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