Fitting the backboard

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Rainbow
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Fitting the backboard

Post by Rainbow » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 8:58 am

Quick question - if you have to fit the backboard to the back of the frame instead of fitting it inside the rebate, is it ever acceptable to glue the backboard to the frame instead of stapling it?

I'm using a profile with a lip and I'm a bit worried that the frame will be vulnerable under the pressure of the stapling. I guess I could build up the inside of the lip before applying the staples but it would be a lot quicker to glue it, if that's acceptable. The picture is about 1m x .06m.

Thoughts anyone?
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Justintime
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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Justintime » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 9:25 am

If the frame feels vulnerable under the pressure of stapling, will it be strong enough for this size of work?

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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Not your average framer » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 9:41 am

To my mind the purpose of the backing board is to provide physical protection at the rear of the frame. In some cases the degree of protection will be more substanial than others to provide a level of protection, which is appropriate for ensuring that if the framed item is temporarily stored, that it is still adequately protected to reflect the value and the vunerability of the frames contents.

If the backing board is glued on, how will it be possible to access the contents of the frame to inspect the condition of the contents of this frame at a later date. The use of unnecessary force at a later date by someone who cannot simply remove the back by normal means, may involve a possible risk of damage to the contents.

Personally, I would consider building on the back with a glued on spacer, so that the back can sit inside this spacer and against the proper back surface of the original frame, while securing the back into the spacer with normal framing points. Removing the back at a later date then becomes very easy, and straight forward and the backing board is not damaged, during removal.

As this does not sound like you intend this to be a ready made frame, I am assuming that there may be a need to tape the rear of the frame to exclude dust and insects.
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Rainbow
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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Rainbow » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 9:54 am

Justintime wrote:
Tue 27 Oct, 2020 9:25 am
If the frame feels vulnerable under the pressure of stapling, will it be strong enough for this size of work?
I only say vulnerable because unless I build it up to the level of the lip, there's nothing to support it if I fire staples down into the back, which seems a bit risky.

I wouldn't have thought of using spacers in the way you describe, Mark, but it's an option, thanks.

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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Justintime » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 10:10 am

I understand your problem, I oftem misjudge the depth required, recently a tapestry laced onto board with wadding. It was way thicker than i imagined. If you have access to a small bandsaw then cutting down an offcut to extend out the back, like a subframe but fixed to the back, like Mark suggested, is ideal and once taped looks fine. I did try it with bought spacers but they were too narrow. I believe Mark, with his range of power tools is probably talking about the same idea.

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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Not your average framer » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 11:04 am

Yes, that is often what I do, but different framers will use whatever method is most practical for them. Those that don't have the facilities to cut up left over scraps will simply do it by anothor means. You can often buy fillets and spacers for a framing supplier, of buy small lengths of in-expensive strip wood from a hardware shop, or DIY shop. I'm not advocating expensive mouldings, that some of these places sell. What you buy needs to be affordable and provide a practical solution to whatever you may be doing.

How I would be thinking of doing it, is not always going to be the same as anyone else. Who says that it needs to be done in a particular method? If the workmanship is reasonable, adequate and of a moderately professional standard, your customers will be well pleased and will say nice things about you and the quality of your work. Sure it's nice to have a band saw, or a table saw to enable you to cut down bits of scrap to do this, but who said that it is a necessary requirement? It is not and it does not matter, after a while you will do your own thing and it will work just fine.
Mark Lacey

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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Justintime » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 11:59 am

Nobody said that it was a necessary requirement Mark. I mentioned it because since I was loaned one, I have found it incredibly useful and now wouldn't be without it. I can highly recommend getting one,especially for problems like this, that is all.
This is a forum of sharing information, there really is no fascism here for what must or mustn't be done or tools you must or must not have, maybe over enthusiasm occasionally but nothing more. :Slap:

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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Not your average framer » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 12:16 pm

Thanks Justin,

I just feel a little aware, that maybe I am pushing the band saw a bit to much and dont wand to be making many of the newbies think that it's strictly necessary equipment. I used to get by with just the basics, but after the stroke, I need all the help I can get in order to keep going. I always was a natural at woodwork, so in my case I guess it's just as well.

I have lot of old mouldings and It's probably much more than I will ever be able to use, so the ability to remodel and re-use bits of it makes good sense, hence bits and pieces like the band saw, the table saw and the sliding mitre saw.
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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Steve N » Tue 27 Oct, 2020 3:24 pm

Just cut 4 lots of chervons, out of a flat wood, cover with bubble wrap, use these in the corners to keep the frame off the bench, then fire away
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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by prospero » Wed 28 Oct, 2020 7:25 am

Bear in mind that whatever board you fix to the back is likely to swell at some point and break the corners. :|
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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 28 Oct, 2020 9:15 am

I have various pneumatic nail and pin guns, which enable me to pin and glue a thin spacer frame onto the back of the existing frame. It's very quick and easy and gives you something to fire the framing points into allowing the back to expand and contact while still remaining perfectly flat. Very easy to do! Also,if you have a headless pinner, the pins disappear from view when you tape up the back. The pins act as clamps, while the glue sets.
Mark Lacey

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Re: Fitting the backboard

Post by Rainbow » Wed 28 Oct, 2020 10:48 am

Thank you very much for all the replies :)

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