Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

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Foresty_Forest
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Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

Post by Foresty_Forest » Thu 05 Nov, 2020 9:17 pm

I'm framing an oil on paper painting. It's to be glazed, and the glass will sit on a fillet. The painting floated inside the fillet. There's also going to be a gold slip.

I'm not sure if the slip should sit on top of the glass or beneath it - is probably really obvious but I can't get my head around this?
Also could I please have some suggestions on how to mount the painting? The frame will be black, the fillet will be black, and anything showing behind the painting (which is mostly black) will be black. The easiest thing to do would be to have the edges of the painting beneath the fillet, but I'm worried about damaging the surface of the painting and devaluing it.

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Re: Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

Post by Not your average framer » Thu 05 Nov, 2020 9:44 pm

If the gold slip is big enough to hide the slip, you can fit the gold slip either side of the glass and use the fillet to keep the painting away from the glass.
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prospero
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Re: Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

Post by prospero » Fri 06 Nov, 2020 8:27 am

I've done this with posters: You have to 'jack up' the slip at the back so as not to crimp the edges.

Something like this.....
raisedslipmat001.jpg
raisedslipmat001.jpg (5.48 KiB) Viewed 1109 times
I use linen tape as it has a thickness. Use two layers if necessary. You have to use a slip wide enough to accommodate this.
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Foresty_Forest
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Re: Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

Post by Foresty_Forest » Sat 07 Nov, 2020 8:38 am

Ok, so you've used the slip as the fillet to raise the glass off the poster. I may not need a fillet? I was considering 'pinching' the edges of the painting under the fillet, to hold it place. Worried though that the fillet would adhere to the painting. But we usually mount on oil on canvas right against the rebate of a frame anyway. The main thing here is to keep the glass off the surface of the painting.

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Re: Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

Post by Not your average framer » Mon 22 Mar, 2021 6:07 pm

Good point. I am certainly not suggesting that there is a particular way in which this sort of thing has to be done, but you have already identified a possible isue in this particular case and it seems reasonable to use a paper covered slip, but to take some added precausions to mitigate any preciieved risk as deemed appropriate.

In general, I would anticipate that the paper wrap is normally applied using a self adhesive tape and that this could be detrementally effected by the application of some paints, coatings, or varnishes, some not all applied coating are necessarily considered as being everyones preferred option and we probably will have our own waysof doing this.

I would suggest the possible of backing the reverse side of the paper covered slip with 3M's scotch magic tape, but there are undoutedly other option as well. Scotch magic tape has the advantages of being easy to apply, it's quite a simple thing to do, it's easily obtainable, it is described by the manufacturer as being of conservation quality and it's really reasonably priced. I think that it ticks quite a lot of the right boxes!

Hopefully a few others will be happy to suggest a few alternative ideas as well. Scotch magic tape will not allow any ingredients of the oil paint to penetrate the totally impervious surface provided by the Scotch magic tape and if the oil paint slightly adheres to the surface of the oil painting, it should be very straight forward to lift any scotch magic tape which has stuck to the edges of the painting, with patient and careful use of a suitable conversation friendly solvent.
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pramsay13
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Re: Oil on Paper, glass, slip and fillet - in which order?

Post by pramsay13 » Tue 23 Mar, 2021 1:53 pm

Normally I would use a slip as a decorative way of lifting the glass off the artwork.

That said I'm framing one today that already has a mount, so the slip is above the glass and is purely decorative.

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