Air canisters

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Rainbow
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Air canisters

Post by Rainbow » Tue 24 Mar, 2020 6:42 pm

With no customer framing to do, I've been reading the new Lion catalogue from cover to cover :D

Are these air canisters any good?

https://www.lionpic.co.uk/p/33906/Spray ... osol-400ml

Dust is a constant problem. I did a poster job recently which was largely solid black, and as somebody observed a long time ago, flumbs are black when they land on a white background but mysteriously change to white when it's a black background :head:

I'd be interested to know if anyone's got any experience of the Dust-Off or similar.

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Richard Photofusion » Tue 24 Mar, 2020 7:10 pm

If you don't have a comprepssor, then probably.

I assemble very few frames, but when I do, they are often big, and for a regular gallery client, I dissassemble and fit work we've printed and mounted. On a single 1000x1500 frame, I can easily empty the 20l compressor. 10% goes on the print surface, 40% on the glass, and the rest, pre dusting the insides of the frame.

Also useful for cleaning pocket lint out from the 3.5mm headphone jack, and charging socket of mobile phones.

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Re: Air canisters

Post by prospero » Wed 25 Mar, 2020 12:08 pm

Sorry to put a spoke in the wheel but I would never use compressed air anywhere near artwork.
Rapid movements of air will stir up dust and can even damage art. To my mind, the last thing you need
while doing the glazing is and atmosphere full of floating bits. Sharp eyes and a soft brush and patience. :wink:
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Re: Air canisters

Post by Steve N » Wed 25 Mar, 2020 5:02 pm

Same here as prospero just a soft brush, that way you are in control of where the bits go
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Re: Air canisters

Post by Not your average framer » Wed 25 Mar, 2020 5:30 pm

I've never had any need to use an air canister, or even felt the need to try one. Why does it make any sense to use one for removing dust paricules from inside the frames in this way. A brush has always worked just fine for me. I am amazed that people are paying as much as £7.42 for a 400ml can of "Dust off" which is little more other than fresh air. Sorry it does not make much sense to me.

My brush was not only cheaper than that aerosol can, but the brush has lasted my for many years. How many of these cans are needed by the average framer during a year? It sounds like a lot of money to me. I don't understand how that is going to boost your profits?
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Re: Air canisters

Post by Richard Photofusion » Wed 25 Mar, 2020 8:22 pm

Spoke accepted.

In my case, it is large prints on Baryta paper, mounted onto 3mm Dibond - even when dry, they are scarey fragile, but a mid powered air jet causes them no harm. Some of the frames I've put the mounted prints into, I've met 2, 3, perhaps even four times, and the Dibond loves to generate little wood pflumbs.

I guess I'm an outlier - my work is printing, mounting and laminating, so I like to keep things clean, so there is minimal dust to be kicked up - I don't actually get to play properly with wood.

As an aside, we have a couple of scanners here that I maintain. The Imacon 949/ Hasselblad X5 needs regular cleaning with low pressure air. Clean and mop the HDPE work bench surface with IPA, then apply a sheet of (signmaking) application tape, face up on the bench. Compressed air blows the dust off and down, which then bonds with the app tape . Have used this on a couple of ocassions with smaller frames that have needed assembly. Perhaps I should get a brush, as the oilfree Bambi is damnably loud.

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Rainbow » Wed 25 Mar, 2020 9:24 pm

Thanks for the replies. I can see how using a brush on the inside of frames would work, but on glass? By the time you'd got to the other side of the glass, hasn't the dust settled again on the first half? Unless you've got a very big brush :D

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Re: Air canisters

Post by cleaver » Wed 25 Mar, 2020 11:19 pm

A gentler bit of air can be had with one of those photographers' blowers.


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Re: Air canisters

Post by Jayvee » Thu 26 Mar, 2020 10:37 pm

And there was me getting myself one of these and a dry air oil free compressor! Honestly though probably one of the best things I’ve bought - the anti static action as well as the high speed air makes cleaning a job a breeze - it’s sped up that part of the job three fold!
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Re: Air canisters

Post by Framerpicture » Fri 27 Mar, 2020 5:58 pm

is that an anti static gun Jayvee?

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Richard Photofusion » Fri 27 Mar, 2020 8:01 pm

Oh, that is. Looked into them years ago, but got distracted.

All the man made materials I work with, particualrly Forex Classic, and DiBond are static bunnies, worse still when you peel the release film off.

I need one of those guns in my life.

And some tinsel.

And it would be a massive boon for the scanners - freshly processed film is nice and clean, but older negtives could definately do with a gentle waft from a kilo(V)Bambi.

And speaking of scanning, I think Richard Kenward is based in your town - a true master of scanning and art repro.

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Jayvee » Fri 27 Mar, 2020 9:16 pm

Yup it’s an anti static gun!

Cost a bomb along with the Bambi VTS200D. But I’d do it again! I’ve only had it a month or two...not the best timing due to the current situation. That money could have been better spent I suppose now looking back at it - but we obviously didn’t know what was around the corner!

I’ve wanted one for years - and I’ve keep putting it off/forgetting about it/thinking it was a luxury...I think it’s pretty essential now!

Richard Kenward - he’s a customer of mine - well he was - he’s moved to the Isle of Wight! Lovely chap!! Mind he did have me make something and get it shipped out to him a while back!

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Framerpicture » Sat 28 Mar, 2020 1:44 pm

Thanks for the response Jayveee, which model gun is that? Its something I've long considered :D

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Jayvee » Sun 29 Mar, 2020 7:58 am

It’s a Fraser 4125 and supplied power transformer too...not cheap by a long way...but I honestly think well worth it! On the limited items I’ve been able to use it in before shutdown!

You should be able to get them from any clean room supplier - I got mine from Sensemaster in Chepstow.

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Steve N » Sun 29 Mar, 2020 10:29 am

Rainbow wrote:
Wed 25 Mar, 2020 9:24 pm
Thanks for the replies. I can see how using a brush on the inside of frames would work, but on glass? By the time you'd got to the other side of the glass, hasn't the dust settled again on the first half? Unless you've got a very big brush :D
Well that's the reason not to use compressed air,you just blow the dust everyware, then it will settle everywhere

The way I do it is like

Have the artwork ready to put in the frame

Clean one side of glass,

Flip glass over and clean this side

Place artwork face down on the glass, also placing any barrier board on the back of artwork, and backing board

Now flip the whole lot over, check for and dust etc under glass, if any clear out

Now is the time , if you seal your framing packages to do it if not skip to the next step

Place frame over the whole lot, flip back over and fix back with chosen method

Flip back over, should be looking at the front of the frames picture, now final check for any dust etc, if none

Flip back over and finish the back off, tape up and add hangers and cord
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Re: Air canisters

Post by Rainbow » Mon 30 Mar, 2020 6:46 pm

Thanks for that, Steve. I do similar but instead of putting the artwork on to the glass, I lift the glass up to inspect it after cleaning and then put it down on to the artwork. I'll try doing it your way. Also, I've been using Tork lint-free tissue to clean the glass, together with a glass-cleaning spray. The tissue isn't supposed to break up when damp but mine does, so I might be using too much spray and making the tissue too damp.

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Re: Air canisters

Post by Steve N » Mon 30 Mar, 2020 7:17 pm

I use Tork wipes from Lion , mine always break up, but when they do, I either refold them or start a new one, one of the reasons I don't pick up the glass is , if you pick up then put down on the work, you are putting the surface (of the glass) which was touching the bench covering (carpet on mine) onto the artwork, which could now be wet, from the overspray of the glass cleaner or picked up bits from the bench, and transfering to the artwork, the way I like to do it, I'm putting the artwork down onto (hopefully :( ) dry and dust free surface, well most of the time anyway, also when picking up the glass, you could also put finger marks on it :head:
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