close mounted

Discuss Picture Framing topics.
Everybody welcome.
Post Reply
Uncle Sumo
Posts: 179
Joined: Sun 24 Feb, 2008 8:46 pm
Location: Wirral

close mounted

Post by Uncle Sumo » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 8:03 pm

I`m confused about the term "close mounted". I`ve read that it means "to frame paper art/photos without mountboard". This seems to imply that the glass is touching the art/photo. Doesn`t this lead to issues with condensation and problems with photos/posters adhering to the glass? I`ve had at least one "shiny" poster in to reframe which, when the glass removed, really messed up the image. Fortunately, the owner was with me and I asked him to try it. What does "close mounted" mean? Who does it? When would this be a suitable approach? Is it an old technique no longer endorsed? Do photographers still do this?
Sean

LeFrisp
Posts: 57
Joined: Mon 13 Jul, 2009 8:40 am
Location: Bristol ish
Organisation: James Makes Frames
Interests: My hobby is hobbies
Location: Bristol
Contact:

Re: close mounted

Post by LeFrisp » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 8:22 pm

Flippin good question I have just taken on 3 photos which the customer wants without mounts. I have been racking my brain trying to work out how to raise the glass away from the photograph
Im so far down to a 4mm wide Mount cut to bang on the inside measurement of the frame to separate the image from the glass.... Any Guru advice available?
Who Makes Frames? - James Makes Frames!

w00dward
Posts: 204
Joined: Fri 02 Mar, 2007 11:50 am
Location: Launceston, Cornwall
Organisation: Just here
Interests: 42
Location: Launceston, Cornwall

Re: close mounted

Post by w00dward » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 8:30 pm

The Econospace spacers from Lion will do the job for you.
http://www.lionpic.co.uk/catalog/EconoS ... r,429.aspx
Paul.

Alcohol does not make you FAT
- it makes you LEAN ….
against tables, chairs, floors, walls and ugly people.

IslandViewJake
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue 13 Jan, 2009 6:12 am
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
Organisation: Frame One
Interests: Photography, Music, Travel

Re: close mounted

Post by IslandViewJake » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 8:57 pm

Also available, and which I use a lot, is 'FrameSpace', made by the same company. You have to swipe the edges of the glass first for best fitting results, but that's always a good thing anyway. I think this does a better job, and is re-usable if the glass should ever break or needs replacing for some reason. Follow the below link.

http://www.frametek.com/HTML/FrameSpace/index.html

Roboframer

Re: close mounted

Post by Roboframer » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 9:32 pm

Close mounted or close framed? I've always called it close framed, suppose 'close glazed' would work too!

framemaker

Re: close mounted

Post by framemaker » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 10:17 pm

I call this 'close framed', where a print, poster, pastel, watercolour or whatever is framed without a mount, in a style more suited to oil or acrylic paintings on canvas or board.

I would often use a narrow bevel or flat/hollow sight edge slip (can be rebated or not) which would be painted or gilded, the image sits in this frame, then the glass is put between the slip and outer frame. If they don't want a slip then you could use any number of different types spacers to create a gap between image and glass.

I would say that unless the work is on thickish paper or board or is not dry mount then prepare the customer for possible waves, and especially if you use Art Bak, with its bow, the image will be pushed forward in the centre and this can look quite noticeable.

Roboframer

Re: close mounted

Post by Roboframer » Mon 18 Jan, 2010 10:47 pm

There are also moulding profiles available, especially in aluminium, that have a channel for the glass as well as the normal rebate, but they rattle and also allow dust in, unless you do something about it.

User avatar
prospero
Posts: 10863
Joined: Tue 05 Jun, 2007 4:16 pm
Location: Lincolnshire

Re: close mounted

Post by prospero » Tue 19 Jan, 2010 2:50 am

Econospace is the elegant solution. But I have sometimes just used narrow strips of MB stuck to the glass. (Lay a strip of DS tape along some scrap MB and slice off the width that you need) Black core works quite well. Not had any problems with 'creeping'.

The only thing is, the photo must be mounted (stuck down) to a board. Because close framing effectively clamps the edges of the photo all around, it has no 'elbow room' for expansion. A loose photo (or any paper-based art) will go very wavy very soon when not in a proper window mount.

I won't dwell on the preservation aspects..... :wink:
Watch Out. There's A Humphrey About

Uncle Sumo
Posts: 179
Joined: Sun 24 Feb, 2008 8:46 pm
Location: Wirral

Re: close mounted

Post by Uncle Sumo » Tue 19 Jan, 2010 5:16 pm

Thanks for the replies and advice. Two further questions just to clarify.
1. Does anyone - framer or photographer - place glass directly on top of the photo/image?
2. How bad is the above practice?
Cheers
Sean

IslandViewJake
Posts: 31
Joined: Tue 13 Jan, 2009 6:12 am
Location: Vancouver Island, BC, Canada
Organisation: Frame One
Interests: Photography, Music, Travel

Re: close mounted

Post by IslandViewJake » Tue 19 Jan, 2010 5:53 pm

I'm a photographer/framer. Personally, I never frame anything in contact with the glass. If a client asks me to do that, I patiently explain to them the reasons for not doing so. They never argue. I always leave at least 3/16" between the artwork and the glass/acrylic. I have had occasions where I've opened up old photographic prints in a frame to find them stuck firmly in parts to the glazing. The print is lost at that point. All that 'careful' work years ago for nothing. And to think that it's when a photographic print gets older that it's value appreciates. (Negative lost, etc). That really doesn't make sense to me. In the case of modern ink-jet prints, photographers may argue that it's OK to put the print next to glass; 'I can just print another one off!' Well, that may be so, but if it's been printed on archival quality paper, with similar quality inks, that print may (or probably will) be the only record of that moment around in years to come. Hard drives or other digital storage methods are really no more reliable and durable than negatives, except in a few determined cases, where the problem is foreseen and data is regularly updated for compatibility with contemporary technology. The bottom line, in my opinion is, for the sake of a little extra cost, if a job's worth doing, it's worth doing right.

Roboframer

Re: close mounted

Post by Roboframer » Wed 20 Jan, 2010 1:22 am

Here's a funny thing - There's a huge market for photo frames and poster frames - also for other popular standard paper-sized frames - A5 - A4 - A3 - whatever.

People with standard-sized 'artwork' that is possibly or (more likely) probably hard-earned and/or irreplaceable - with no ideas on what glass contact (or direct backing on to MDF) can do, will go somewhere with a good choice of photo/poster frames. All they want to do is hang it on a wall.

I sell photo/poster frames - made most meself too - no mounts (We do have a range with mounts, but not much above an A4 aperture)

So - if you sell photo/poster frames (which of course could be used for other things bar photos/posters) is it OK if you provide - but the customer fits?

Tyto
Posts: 34
Joined: Wed 19 Sep, 2007 2:25 pm
Location: Norfolk
Organisation: Wild Norfolk
Interests: Photography
Location: Norfolk UK
Contact:

Re: close mounted

Post by Tyto » Wed 20 Jan, 2010 1:04 pm

Hi
I am a photographer / framer and although I never let my work touch the glass I do get asked to frame customers work without a mount. If I can't persuade them to use a mount to keep the art work away from the glass I suggest laminating the work with hotpress gloss lustre laminating film and framing without glass. Not only does this avoid the photo ect sticking to the glass it also cuts down on the weight of the finished job, with a large poster that can be a big abvantage. Not sure if this is a common method of framing but it seems to have worked ok so far.
Peter

Post Reply